About Japanese companies and Japanese business people
What kind of boss can you respect in Japan?

What kind of boss can you respect?   1. Duly appreciates my business results 2. Doesn’t shift the responsibility onto someone else 3. Decisive 4. Fair to everyone without discriminating or favoring 5. Trustworthy 6. Has personal magnetism 7. Can cover his or her subordinate’s failure completely 8. Listens carefully to what others say 9. […]

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Work in Japan: Japan Biz Cultural Words
noren

Noren (暖簾 のれん) Noren, are short curtains with vertical slits hung in front of restaurants, bars, and shops during business hours. The name of the shop or a symbol indicating the products sold there may be dyed into the cloth, so the noren also functions as a shop sign. Since a shop's noren symbolizes the shop, […]

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Work in Japan: Japan Biz Cultural Words
tokonoma

Tokonoma (床の間 とこのま) Tokonoma, a kind of decorative alcove in a Japanese‐style room, normally has such features as raised flooring, one to three hanging scrolls called kakejiku or kakemono on the back wall, and a flower arrangement on the floor. Rooms with tokonoma are not often seen now. Tokonoma is a magnificent room in a Japanese-style […]

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Work in Japan: Japan Biz Cultural Words
tatami

Tatami (畳 たたみ) Tatami, floor mats for Japanese‐style rooms, are filled with woven rice straw and covered with finely‐woven rush. The normal size of one tatami is 180 centimeters long and 90 centimeters wide (approximately 6 feet by 3 feet); the size of Japanese‐style rooms is measured by the number of tatami. It is said […]

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Work in Japan: Japan Biz Cultural Words
shoji

Shoji (障子 しょうじ) Shoji are traditional Japanese sliding doors. Japanese paper is pasted over a wooden latticework, and usually one door slides past the other. They are used in Japanese‐style rooms as partitions or doors, and they can also be fitted into windows. The light shining through shoji can fill rooms with a nice and […]

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Work in Japan: Japan Biz Cultural Words
ozashiki

Zashiki (座敷 ざしき) A zashiki refers to a tatami‐matted Japanese‐style room, and in particular a room for entertaining guests. A zashiki commonly has a Japanese‐style alcove called a tokonoma that holds decorative materials such as kakejiku (a Japanese‐style painting or piece of calligraphy) and a flower arrangement. In business, when you serve guests, you may use […]

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Work in Japan: Japan Biz Cultural Words
Mizuhiki (水引 みずひき)

Mizuhiki (水引 みずひき) In Japan, strands of paper string (mizuhiki) are used to decorate gifts and ceremonial utensils in much the same way ribbons are used in the West. Not only are they colorful, but a mark of elegance and respect. When you attend a wedding ceremony, you put a congratulatory gift money in these […]

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Work in Japan: Japan Biz Cultural Words
hanko

Hanko (はんこ) A hanko, or personal seal used as a legal method of identification in Japan. The engraving of seals is an art in itself, the best seals being carved from ivory and the poorest from rubber with various gradations of quality in between. A careful observer can tell what a seal is made of […]

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Work in Japan: Japan Biz Cultural Words
Kumade and Engi-Kumade

Kumade and Engi-Kumade Kumade as a Farm Tool Kumade is used for a variety of purposes, such as collecting dead leaves, raking hay, and softening and leveling the soil. Modern rakes have teeth made of steel, plastic, or other materials, but in the past, some rakes were made of wood or cast iron. The handle […]

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Work in Japan: Japan Biz Cultural Words
Mikoshi

Mikoshi (Mikoshi 神輿) A mikoshi, or portable shrine, is a temporary house for the spirit of the deity for whom the festival is being held and is carried on the shoulders of a group of men and sometimes women. Wherever the mikoshi is carried, a sacred purifying force is believed to cleanse the area, radiating […]

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