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Japanese are not used to make a presentation. Be careful if you are too talkative, you won’t seem trusted.

Japanese are not used to make a presentation. Be careful if you are too talkative, you won’t seem trusted.

<Japanese are not used to make a presentation>
In contrast, the Japanese education system offers very little opportunity to present in front of groups. Students are discouraged from speaking out or even asking questions in class, since this slows down the delivery of facts from teacher to student. Believe it or not, the first time many Japanese students get the chance to present in front of the class is when they study English in university! They make their first oral presentations in English, not Japanese. No wonder the Japanese are impressed at the ease with which Americans can hold forth in meetings.

<Americans are good at presenting themselves>
The American school system places a lot of emphasis on the ability to convey information well. From their first days in kindergarten and “show and tell,” Americans have the opportunity to stand and present in front of the class. Throughout their years of formal education, they learn to handle public speaking challenges of increasingly greater complexity—from short speeches on everyday topics to longer presentations in front of larger audiences. This is an important career skill. The higher the position, the more outstanding the oral and written communication skills required. Even entry-level employees are expected to be able to make polished presentations about their work.